Maine is Behind Us

Written by Mark Koneff
Friday, May 04, 2012

Photo of Mark Koneff.We finished Maine on May 3 and began surveys in northern New Brunswick today. Conditions in northeastern Maine and northern New Brunswick appear drier than they are in the more southerly regions of Maine. In contrast to the flooding observed last spring, the St. John River, which runs through Fredericton, NB, remains within its banks. Like Maine, New Brunswick and the other Maritime Provinces received relatively little snow this past winter. Next, we’ll complete southern New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Nova Scotia before heading back to Bangor for a few days for an aircraft inspection. Following that we’ll be on to Newfoundland and Labrador.

Clear cut on ridge top.

Clear cut on ridge top. Photo by H. Obrecht, US FWS, retired

Kouchibouguac National Park on the shore of the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

Kouchibouguac National Park on the shore of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Photo by M. Koneff, US FWS

Wetlands are drier in northern New Brunswick similar to northeastern Maine.

Wetlands are drier in northern New Brunswick similar to northeastern Maine. Photo by H. Obrecht, US FWS, retired

The peak of Mt. Katahdin visible above a low overcast layer in central Maine.

The peak of Mt. Katahdin visible above a low overcast layer in central Maine. Photo by M. Koneff, US FWS

Potato fields in Aroostook County, Maine.  This region has not benefited as much from recent rains as has southern Maine and wetlands here are drier.

Potato fields in Aroostook County, Maine. This region has not benefited as much from recent rains as has southern Maine and wetlands here are drier. Photo by H. Obrecht, US FWS, retired

Aerial view of northern Aroostook County, Maine.

Aerial view of northern Aroostook County, Maine. Photo by H. Obrecht, US FWS, retired