Wrapping Up the Ground Counts in Southern Saskatchewan

Written by Jean-Michel DeVink
Friday, May 27, 2011

Photo of Jean-Michel DeVink.The ground crews ended their counts on Friday, with one last transect just north of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. Overall, the northern prairies of Saskatchewan were dryer than in the south due to less spring precipitation, but held good numbers of waterfowl nonetheless. We observed many canvasbacks, redheads, and other divers in the north, along with the usual dabbler species found along the forest.

Ground data are now being compiled and will be combined with air counts for the Southern Saskatchewan crew area to produce the annual waterfowl estimates that are used to help set harvest regulations in the US for the coming fall. Overall, our sense is that there are lots of breeding waterfowl in the Saskatchewan portion of the Canadian prairies, and if conditions hold out and the birds avoid depredation through the summer, there should be good production and an excellent fall flight.

From all the Saskatchewan ground crew, we wish everyone a successful 2011 waterfowling season.

A red fox on the run across a pasture in the Saskatchewan parkland.  Foxes are an important waterfowl predator, and avoiding these toothy critters is key to pulling off a brood of ducklings.

A red fox on the run across a pasture in the Saskatchewan parkland. Foxes are an important waterfowl predator, and avoiding these toothy critters is key to pulling off a brood of ducklings. Photo by Jean-Michel DeVink, CWS

A pair of Green-winged Teal rest on a roadside pond in the Saskatchewan parkland.

A pair of Green-winged Teal rest on a roadside pond in the Saskatchewan parkland. Photo by Jean-Michel DeVink, CWS