Atlantic Population Canada Goose Survey

Written by Mark Koneff
Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Photo of Mark Koneff.Long-time biologist-observers Bill Harvey (Maryland), Jean Rodrigue (Quebec) and I arrived in Kuujjuaq, Quebec, on the southwest shore of Ungava Bay on June 12. Bill and I left Bangor, Maine, on June 11, met up with Jean, and over-nighted in Sept-Iles, Quebec, since we were unable to secure lodging for the 11th in Kuujjuaq. We flew a few survey transects south and east of Kuujjuaq on the way north and arrived in Kuujjuaq to very uncharacteristically hazy, hot, and humid conditions. We had some unwanted excitement while trying to secure our Quest Kodiak Amphibian on the ramp in Kuujjuaq in a thunderstorm and associated microburst. Thankfully, the plane and crew came through safely so we can continue the survey of this important goose population. Around Kuujjuaq, spring phenology appears advanced from 2011, with leaves already appearing on willows and other deciduous shrubs and all wetlands free of ice cover.

Cool and rainy day in downtown Kuujjuaq.

Cool and rainy day in downtown Kuujjuaq. Photo by M. Koneff, US FWS

A small polygonal bog. These raised polygonal mounds are formed by subsurface ice wedges and freeze/thaw contractions.

A small polygonal bog. These raised polygonal mounds are formed by subsurface ice wedges and freeze/thaw contractions. Photo by M. Koneff, US FWS

Uncharacteristically hazy, hot, and humid conditions while surveying the tiaga region south of Kuujjuaq.

Uncharacteristically hazy, hot, and humid conditions while surveying the tiaga region south of Kuujjuaq. Photo by M. Koneff, US FWS