Surveys completed in New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Nova Scotia

Written by Rob Spangler
Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Our surveys concluded today for New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Nova Scotia just in time for the 100-hour inspection of N766 here in Halifax, Nova Scotia. As we continue our surveys, it is increasingly apparent how early this Spring is compared with past years. A merganser with newly hatched young was observed yesterday in Nova Scotia, as well as increasing numbers of flocked ducks and single drakes, both indicators of an early breeding season. Overall, ring neck duck counts appear to be higher than last year and it is encouraging to see the excellent habitat conditions since the beginning of our survey in Maine. Following our 100-hour inspection, we will be crossing the Gulf of St. Lawrence into Newfoundland for more surveys before continuing north to Labrador. There, we will sneak in our surveys between the retrograding low pressure systems that have been bringing rain and snow to the northern portions of our area.

Fueling the plane at Halifax before departing for surveys on Prince Edward Island.(Credit:  Rob Spangler, USFWS)

Fueling the plane at Halifax before departing for surveys on Prince Edward Island. Credit: Rob Spangler, USFWS

Bay of Fundy with with the highest tidal fluctuation in the world. (Credit:  Rob Spangler, USFWS)

Bay of Fundy with with the highest tidal fluctuation in the world. Credit: Rob Spangler, USFWS

Tidal Habitat on Prince Edward Island. (Credit:  Rob Spangler, USFWS)

Tidal Habitat on Prince Edward Island. Credit: Rob Spangler, USFWS

Western Shore of Prince Edward Island - note wind farms and potato fields. (Credit:  Rob Spangler, USFWS)

Western Shore of Prince Edward Island - note wind farms and potato fields. Credit: Rob Spangler, USFWS

Western Shore of Prince Edward Island. (Credit:  Rob Spangler, USFWS)

Western Shore of Prince Edward Island. Credit: Rob Spangler, USFWS

Coast of New Bruswick - typical habitat with lots of boreal forest and some interspersed streams, ponds and salt water inlets. (Credit:  Rob Spangler, USFWS)

Coast of New Bruswick - typical habitat with lots of boreal forest and some interspersed streams, ponds and salt water inlets. Credit: Rob Spangler, USFWS

Instrument panel of the Partenavia used for the survey. (Credit:  Rob Spangler, USFWS)

Instrument panel of the Partenavia used for the survey. Credit: Rob Spangler, USFWS

Intertidal wetland along coast of Nova Scotia. (Credit:  Rob Spangler, USFWS)

Intertidal wetland along coast of Nova Scotia. Credit: Rob Spangler, USFWS

Typical ringneck and black duck habitat in the boreal forest of Nova Scotia. (Credit:  Rob Spangler, USFWS)

Typical ringneck and black duck habitat in the boreal forest of Nova Scotia Credit: Rob Spangler, USFWS

Typical stream habitat in Nova Scotia. (Credit:  Rob Spangler, USFWS)

Typical stream habitat in Nova Scotia. Credit: Rob Spangler, USFWS

Flyway Biologist/Pilot John Bidwell searches for hard to find waterfowl in Nova Scotia. (Credit:  Rob Spangler, USFWS)

Flyway Biologist/Pilot John Bidwell searches for hard to find waterfowl in Nova Scotia. Credit: Rob Spangler, USFWS