Atlantic Crew Nears the Finish Line

Written by Mark Koneff
Tuesday, June 07, 2011

Photo of Mark Koneff.We arrived in Goose Bay, Labrador, on June 6, and with a couple of good days of weather behind us, we’ve finished over half of our final strata of the survey. Conditions are generally good in Labrador. Due to weather delays in the south, the Labrador survey is running about a week behind normal timing, but timing appears reasonable with respect to breeding phenology. We’re probably a little late for early nesters, but about perfect for late nesting species like scaup and scoters. We arrived at the Goose Bay Airport this morning to be greeted by a U.S. Air Force C-5 Transport on the ramp near N769. The aircraft unfortunately experienced mechanical problems that grounded it temporarily in Goose Bay. It was full of troops returning from the Middle East. We’re hoping for a speedy repair so they can finish their journey home. During a fuel stop we also met up with a ski-equipped LC-130H of the 109th Air Wing out of Schenectady, NY. The crew was transporting a cadre of scientists and support staff to Greenland for the summer research season. It was great spending a little time with the crew and some of the passengers in between our flights.

Waterfowl on the western slope of the Mealy Mountains.

Waterfowl on the western slope of the Mealy Mountains. Photo by J. Bidwell, US FWS (retired)

Still lots of ice and snow at higher elevations east of Goose Bay. The cliff face contains the mineral Labradorite and is iridescent in the right light.

Still lots of ice and snow at higher elevations east of Goose Bay. The cliff face contains the mineral Labradorite and is iridescent in the right light. Photo by M. Koneff, US FWS

A testament to the weather delays we've experienced this year, few icebergs remain along the southeast Labrador coast.

A testament to the weather delays we've experienced this year, few icebergs remain along the southeast Labrador coast. Photo by M. Koneff, US FWS

Mist off the appropriately named Ghost Lake begins to conceal a boulder-strewn landscape.

Mist off the appropriately named Ghost Lake begins to conceal a boulder-strewn landscape. Photo by J. Bidwell, US FWS (retired)