Survey of Northwest Territories Finished

Written by Fred Roetker
Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Photo of Fred Roetker.Mark Koneff and I finished the Northwest Territories today. After one the latest springs in years, ice break-up happened fast and birds seemed to immediately occupy the smaller wetlands as they became ice free. The larger lakes were slower to thaw as usual, however birds were taking advantage of shoreline habitat during our survey. After waiting for the ice to leave, the weather mostly cooperated during our effort. Most of the survey was flown under ideal conditions with light winds. Duck numbers appeared strong.

Fred Roetker (right) and Mark Koneff shared pilot and observer duties in the Northwest Territories in 2013.

Fred Roetker (right) and Mark Koneff shared pilot and observer duties in the Northwest Territories in 2013. Photo by Mark Koneff, US FWS

Crossing the Mackenzie River on survey line. The Makenzie's massive drainage and delta is remarkable boreal waterfowl habitat.

Crossing the Mackenzie River on survey line. The Makenzie's massive drainage and delta is remarkable boreal waterfowl habitat. Photo by Mark Koneff, US FWS

Countless wetlands like this throughout the Mackenzie River drainage system provide ideal nesting opportunities for both dabblers and divers.

Countless wetlands like this throughout the Mackenzie River drainage system provide ideal nesting opportunities for both dabblers and divers. Photo by Mark Koneff, US FWS

High quality waterfowl habitat along the north shore of Great Slave Lake 40 miles southwest of Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. A U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service duck banding crew will be present here in August 2013.

High quality waterfowl habitat along the north shore of Great Slave Lake 40 miles southwest of Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. A U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service duck banding crew will be present here in August 2013. Photo by Mark Koneff, US FWS