Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia Done, Fog Grounds Crew in Halifax

Written by Mark Koneff
Saturday, May 24, 2014

Photo of Mark Koneff.The Maine and Atlantic Canada survey crew completed Prince Edward Island on May 16 and made it into Halifax, Nova Scotia. A Jet Stream pattern that causes persistent poor weather in Atlantic Canada set up after that, and we’ve been largely stranded in fog, low ceilings, rain and cold ever since. We had a short weather window on May 21 that allowed us to finish our remaining lines in Nova Scotia. The following day we completed a required inspection on the aircraft and we’ve been sitting and waiting on weather since. Forecasts don’t look particularly favorable for the better part of a week, but we’re hoping for a change so we can cross the Gulf of St. Lawrence and begin surveying in Newfoundland. Breeding habitat conditions across PEI and Nova Scotia were good. Phenology remains significantly delayed across the region so I don’t anticipate any concerns related to survey timing if we can get moving soon. There’s plenty of office work to do, data analyses to complete, and lobsters to eat, but it would be great to see some blue in the sky again and get moving...

Sandstone parent material in northern Nova Scotia weathers to a red clay that clouds the waters of the Shubenacadie River.

Sandstone parent material in northern Nova Scotia weathers to a red clay that clouds the waters of the Shubenacadie River. Photo by Mark Koneff, US FWS

Maritimes weather proving uncooperative in 2014.

Maritimes weather proving uncooperative in 2014. Photo by Mark Koneff, US FWS

Fog on the west coast of Nova Scotia obscures beginning of survey transect.

Fog on the west coast of Nova Scotia obscures beginning of survey transect. Photo by Mark Koneff, US FWS