A Tale of Two Seasons...

Written by Mark Koneff
Saturday, May 09, 2015

Photo of Mark Koneff.Back in March, looking out the window of our Maine farmhouse at 8-foot snow piles in the dooryard and 4-foot ice pack on local lakes, I would have bet good money that in May we’d be worried about flooding and enjoying a prolonged mud and productive black fly season. I’m glad I’m not a betting man because nothing could be further from the truth. Despite the very cold, very long, and very snowy winter, spring has seen little precipitation so far and it’s dry by Maine standards for May. Instead of flooding we’re worried about fires. Dry conditions prevail across the state and many wetlands, ponds and lakes are obviously drawn down. Streams and rivers are running at basically summer flows. Duck counts were down some too from recent years. Of course there is always a silver lining, as the dry conditions have also meant a mild start to black fly season. Hey, we’ll take it. We’re wrapped up in Maine and we’ve moved to Fredericton, NB. We’ll check back in later with an update on conditions in the Maritimes.

Drying wetland basin in central Maine.

Drying wetland basin in central Maine. Photo by Mark Koneff, US FWS

Drying beaver flowage in central Maine.

Drying beaver flowage in central Maine. Photo by Mark Koneff, US FWS

Last remnants of ice in northwestern Maine.

Last remnants of ice in northwestern Maine. Photo by Mark Koneff, US FWS

Mt. Katahdin summit.  My observer, Brad Rogers, hiked the Appalachian Trail from GA to the NH/ME border only to be forced to quit after becoming ill.  Here's the summit he never reached!

Mt. Katahdin summit. My observer, Brad Rogers, hiked the Appalachian Trail from GA to the NH/ME border only to be forced to quit after becoming ill. Here's the summit he never reached! Photo by Mark Koneff, US FWS

Greenville ME airport.

Greenville ME airport. Photo by Mark Koneff, US FWS

Its dry in potato country north of Presque Isle, ME too.

Its dry in potato country north of Presque Isle, ME too. Photo by Mark Koneff, US FWS