Hunter Activity and Harvest Report for 2014-15 and 2015-16 Seasons Released

Hunter setting decoys. Credit: Milton Friend/USFWS

The latest Migratory Bird Hunting Activity and Harvest Report has been released, reporting that nearly 13.3 million ducks were harvested in the United States in 2014, with a decrease to nearly 11 million ducks harvested in 2015. The number of harvested geese was over 3.3 million nationally in 2014, decreasing to just over 2.5 million geese in 2015.

In addition to downloading the full report, you can also generate custom harvest trends reports to quickly and easily view the information that is important to you. With these custom reports, you can view harvest trends for a specific species in a specific state; or you can view results for all ducks or all geese on a national level or within a selected flyway; or you can see the total of all ducks and geese at the national level. Results from these custom reports are presented in line graph format to easily illustrate harvest trends from 1961 through 2014. To view harvest activity reports for previous years, visit the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Migratory Bird Management website.

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Run a Custom Harvest Trends Report

2017 Adaptive Harvest Management Report

This hard copy report provides waterfowl managers and the public with information about the use of Adaptive Harvest Management for setting waterfowl regulations in the United States.

Download AHM Report

Public Invited to the 2016 Federal Duck Stamp Selection Event

Image of judging duck stamp entries from the 2012 contest

Waterfowlers have the opportunity to view some amazing artwork at the 2016 Federal Duck Stamp Contest event that will be held at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia, September 9th and 10th. The event is fully open to the public, including free general admission to the Natural Sciences museum, and will culminate on the 10th in a panel of five judges selecting the artwork that will be featured on this year's Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp (also known as the "Duck Stamp"). The stamp has generated more than $900 million to help protect and conserve over six million acres of wetland, bottomland, and grassland habitat for waterfowl and other birds and wildlife. You can learn much more about the stamp and contest event on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website or by connecting with the Friends of the Migratory Bird/Duck Stamp, an independent, nonprofit organization dedicated to the promotion, preservation, sales, and better understanding of the Duck Stamp.

Learn more about the duck stamp and contest event.

Visit the Friends of the Migratory Bird/Duck Stamp website.

2016-17 Federal and Junior Duck Stamps Now on Sale

Image of 2016-17 Duck Stamp

Sales for the 2015-2016 Federal Duck Stamp and Junior Duck Stamp began on Friday, June 24, 2016 with a special event hosted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Postal Service and Bass Pro Shops at the Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World in Springfield, Missouri. Waterfowl hunters, birders, stamp collectors, conservationists and outdoor recreationists lined up to be among the first to buy the nation’s most unique and successful conservation stamp. This year's Federal stamp features trumpeter swans and is the work of Minnesotan Joe Hautman, and 16-year-old Stacy Shen painted the Ross's geese that adorn this year's Junior Duck Stamp. A stamp purchase is required annually for all waterfowl hunters 16 and older, and grants the bearer free entrance into national wildlife refuges. The new stamps can be purchased online, at many sporting goods and retail stores, and at some post offices and national wildlife refuges. Since 1934, the Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp has provided more than $850 million, conserving over 5.7 million acres of crucial habitat throughout the United States and its territories.

Using New Process for Setting Game Bird Hunting Seasons, USFWS Proposes 2016-17 Migratory Bird Frameworks

Image of ducks Credit: katdaned, Flickr

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed continued liberal game bird season lengths and bag limits for the 2016-17 hunting seasons, due to steady or improving population numbers. This marks the first implementation of a more streamlined process for setting annual migratory game bird hunting seasons and bag limit, compressing the previous two-cycle regulatory practice into a single, annual process. Biological data from the past year will now be used to set season dates and project harvest limits for each game species. This gives biologists more time to analyze bird survey data and gives the public more time to comment on proposed rules, and also ensures that administrative procedures don't lead to delays in the opening of state hunting seasons.

The 2016-17 federal frameworks propose duck hunting season lengths of 60 days in both the Atlantic and Mississippi flyways and 74 days in the Central Flyway (with an additional 23 days in the High Plains areas), with a daily bag limit of six ducks in each of those flyways. Proposed duck hunting frameworks for the Pacific Flyway would allow a 107-day season and a seven-bird daily bag limit. A 16-day special September teal season with a six-bird daily bag limit is proposed to continue to be offered in certain states in the Atlantic, Mississippi and Central flyways. Proposed regulations for geese also are largely unchanged from 2015-16 seasons and in several cases are very liberal in an attempt to reduce their abundance.

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Waterfowl Hunting Season Frameworks Proposed, Process for Setting Seasons Streamlined

Image of dog retrieving duck, Credit: Guy Huntley, Flickr

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed hunting regulations for the upcoming 2015-2016 late waterfowl seasons. Hunting season lengths of 60 days were proposed for the Atlantic and Mississippi Flyways, with 74 days for the Central Flyway (with an additional 23 days in the High Plains areas) and 107 days for the Pacific Flyway.

A full season on pintails would be offered nation-wide with a two bird daily bag limit, and a full season on canvasbacks with a two bird daily bag limit offered nation-wide.

States will select their individual seasons from within the federal frameworks that establish the earliest beginning and latest ending dates and the maximum season length and bag limits.

The Service is also streamlining the process by which it sets annual migratory game bird hunting seasons and bag limits. Beginning with the 2016-17 hunting seasons, the current two-cycle regulatory practice will be compressed into a single annual process.The new streamlined process to set annual migratory game bird hunting seasons and bag limits will rely on biological data from the past year to set hunting season dates and project appropriate harvest limits for each game species. The change will give biologists more time to analyze bird survey data that inform the Service’s regulatory decisions and will give the public more time to comment on proposed rules. The change will also ensure that administrative procedures do not delay the opening of state hunting seasons.

Hunter Activity and Harvest Report for 2013-14 and 2014-15 Seasons Released

Hunter setting decoys. Credit: Milton Friend/USFWS

The latest Migratory Bird Hunting Activity and Harvest Report has been released, reporting that over 13.7 million ducks were harvested in the United States in 2013, with a decrease to just less than 13.3 million ducks harvested in 2014. The number of harvested geese was nearly 3.4 million nationally in 2013, decreasing somewhat to just over 3.3 million geese in 2014.

In addition to downloading the full report, you can also generate custom harvest trends reports to quickly and easily view the information that is important to you. With these custom reports, you can view harvest trends for a specific species in a specific state; or you can view results for all ducks or all geese on a national level or within a selected flyway; or you can see the total of all ducks and geese at the national level. Results from these custom reports are presented in line graph format to easily illustrate harvest trends from 1961 through 2013. To view harvest activity reports for previous years, visit the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Migratory Bird Management website.

Download Harvest Report

Run a Custom Harvest Trends Report

2015 Adaptive Harvest Management Report

This hard copy report provides waterfowl managers and the public with information about the use of Adaptive Harvest Management for setting waterfowl regulations in the United States.

Download AHM Report

2015-16 Federal and Junior Duck Stamps Now On Sale

Image of 2014-15 Duck Stamp

Sales for the 2015-2016 Federal Duck Stamp and Junior Duck Stamp began on Friday, June 26, 2013 with a special event hosted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Bass Pro Shops at the Bass Pro Shops at the Pyramid in Memphis, Tennessee. Partners from Ducks Unlimited and the U.S. Postal Service also participated in the event, where waterfowl hunters, birders, stamp collectors, conservationists and outdoor recreationists lined up to be among the first to buy the nation’s most unique and successful conservation stamp. The new stamps can be purchased online, at many sporting goods and retail stores, and at some post offices and national wildlife refuges. Since 1934, the Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp ("Duck Stamp") has provided more than $850 million, conserving over 6.5 million acres of crucial habitat throughout the United States and its territories.

Find more information

Liberal Late Season Waterfowl Hunting Frameworks Proposed

Image of dog retrieving duck, Credit: dglassme, Flickr

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed liberal hunting season lengths and bag limits for the upcoming 2014-2015 late waterfowl seasons. Duck hunting season lengths of 60 days were proposed for the Atlantic and Mississippi Flyways, with 74 days for the Central Flyway (with an additional 23 days in the High Plains areas) and 107 days for the Pacific Flyway.

States will select their individual seasons from within the federal frameworks that establish the earliest beginning and latest ending dates and the maximum season length and bag limits.

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