Eastern and Northern Ontario

Most counts up from 2008 so far

Eastern and Northern Ontario
Written by Mark Koneff
Sunday, May 31, 2009

Photo of Mark Koneff.We’re in Peawanuck, Ontario, on the shores of Hudson Bay at the mouth of the Winisk River. We completed the boreal forest of the Nickel Belt and Claybelt Regions as well as the southern James Bay Lowlands last week and, in general, breeding habitats were in good condition and counts of most duck species were up from 2008. After arriving in Peawanuck, we finished the northern James Bay Lowlands up to Cape Henrietta-Maria. Wetlands in this region were also in good condition, but conditions deteriorated in northern sections along the Hudson Bay where most water remained frozen. Good numbers of dabblers, divers, snow geese, and Canada geese were found aggregated on what little open water existed around the Cape. Yesterday, in Peawanuck (May 30) we received approximately 5 inches of fresh snow and strong winds caused drifting. Today we will remove drifts around the plane and fuel drums while waiting on crews to plow the runway. We have only the Hudson Bay Lowlands west of Peawanuck (to the Manitoba border) to complete.

Water conditions good in the Nickel Belt and Clay Belt

Eastern and Northern Ontario
Written by Mark Koneff
Tuesday, May 12, 2009

Mark KoneffToday we moved into the boreal forest north of Lake Huron, a region known as the Nickel Belt because of the important ore deposits found there.  This survey stratum extends north and east through the boreal forest and into the Clay Belt, an area of agricultural production on the Ontario-Quebec Border. Winter and spring precipitation in the Nickel and Clay Belts was average and wetlands throughout most of this area have been observed to be in good condition.  We are presently in Kapuskasing, Ontario (which is about 130 nautical miles from the southern shore of James Bay) waiting on weather to clear so we can resume the survey.

Survey begins in Eastern and Northern Ontario

Eastern and Northern Ontario
Written by Mark Koneff
Friday, May 08, 2009

Mark KoneffMy observer, Guthrie Zimmerman (USFWS) and I began the survey on May 8 in the interlakes agricultural region of southwest Ontario. Snowfall was average across southwest Ontario through February when warm temperatures led to an early thaw. Snowfall and rain from February to May resulted in wetlands at full capacity at the time of the survey and nesting conditions across this region were excellent across southwest Ontario.

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