Maine and Atlantic Canada

Survey of Newfoundland completed – habitat excellent

Maine and Atlantic Canada
Written by John Bidwell
Tuesday, June 02, 2009

Photo of John Bidwell.We have now completed our survey of Newfoundland, and have only one day left to finish up Labrador. We are pleased to report that overall conditions are classified as good or excellent in 2009. Winter temperatures were below average in both provinces, and Newfoundland had well below average snowfall, particularly in the central highlands. Newfoundland also experienced mild temperatures in late April and early May, creating early nesting conditions. Overall, Newfoundland’s habitat conditions were considered excellent. In Labrador, colder temperatures persisted throughout early spring with lakes still frozen at the end of May and snow still dominating the higher elevations. Waterfowl concentrated on available habitat at lower elevations, but breeding social groups were still evident; we anticipate these pairs will move into habitat as soon as it opens up in early June. Overall, we rated Labrador habitat conditions as good. Timing of the survey was a bit late for black ducks in Labrador and Newfoundland – we observed only occasional groups – but was ideal for Canada geese, which were predominately recorded as pairs and singles.

Halfway done; duck numbers up from last year

Maine and Atlantic Canada
Written by John Bidwell
Wednesday, May 13, 2009

John BidwellWe are almost halfway through our survey of Maine and the Atlantic provinces now, having completed Maine, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and much of Nova Scotia. Habitat conditions remain excellent for all the areas we have seen to date. Numbers of black ducks, ringnecks, goldeneyes and Canada geese are up everywhere we have surveyed. Numbers may not be as high as we saw in 2007, but they are much better than 2008. Waterfowl in this part of the world seem to like small wetlands and beaver flowages, rather than the larger wetlands that might see tremendous use out in the prairies. The Atlantic seaboard will never have the sheer numbers of breeding ducks that are found in the prairies, but it’s great to see the numbers up from last year.

Maine and Atlantic Canada survey begins

Maine and Atlantic Canada
Written by John Bidwell
Sunday, May 03, 2009

John BidwellOur 2009 survey began by flying out of Bangor, Maine. We started along the coastal areas, and then turned inland, over the boreal forest. Early indications are very good. The water is open, ducks are nesting, and there is no sign of the tremendous flooding we saw here last year. Spring came very late last year, and heavy flooding had many of the prime nesting areas underwater. As a result, duck numbers were well below normal — for all species surveyed. It’s impossible to predict what conditions will be like over the remainder of our survey area, but we are very encouraged by what we’ve seen so far.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Maine and Atlantic Canada