Ungava Peninsula

Atlantic Population Canada Goose Survey

Ungava Peninsula
Written by Mark Koneff
Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Photo of Mark Koneff.Long-time biologist-observers Bill Harvey (Maryland), Jean Rodrigue (Quebec) and I arrived in Kuujjuaq, Quebec, on the southwest shore of Ungava Bay on June 12. Bill and I left Bangor, Maine, on June 11, met up with Jean, and over-nighted in Sept-Iles, Quebec, since we were unable to secure lodging for the 11th in Kuujjuaq. We flew a few survey transects south and east of Kuujjuaq on the way north and arrived in Kuujjuaq to very uncharacteristically hazy, hot, and humid conditions. We had some unwanted excitement while trying to secure our Quest Kodiak Amphibian on the ramp in Kuujjuaq in a thunderstorm and associated microburst. Thankfully, the plane and crew came through safely so we can continue the survey of this important goose population. Around Kuujjuaq, spring phenology appears advanced from 2011, with leaves already appearing on willows and other deciduous shrubs and all wetlands free of ice cover.

Surveying the Canada Goose Atlantic Population

Ungava Peninsula
Written by Mark Koneff
Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Photo of Mark Koneff.The poor flying weather, and associated delays, that we (the Maine and Atlantic Canada Survey crew) experienced during the Waterfowl Breeding Population and Habitat Survey in May and early June forced me to proceed directly into the Canada Goose Atlantic Population Survey of the Ungava Peninsula. On June 10, I parted ways with John Bidwell, my observer for May and early June and flew from Goose Bay, Labrador 400 miles north to Kuujjuaq, Quebec on the shores of the Ungava Bay. There I met up with Bill Harvey, Maryland Wildlife and Heritage Service, and Jean Rodrigue, Canadian Wildlife Service, who would be my observers for the AP goose survey of the Ungava Peninsula. We began the survey on June 11 and, surprisingly after the struggles we had in May and early June in Atlantic Canada, had excellent weather for the survey. We were completed and home by June 22. The only significant delay was a 3-day period we spent waiting on a replacement main wheel assembly for the Wipline 7000 amphibious floats installed on our Quest Kodiak survey aircraft. One of our tires suffered damage resulting in a slow leak, possibly from operations off the gravel runway at Kuujjuaq. The speedy survey was a welcome relief after the many weather delays earlier in the spring.

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